US Research Study shows massive potential for Sri Lankan Cinnamon Friday

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US research study shows massive potential for Sri Lankan cinnamon  Friday, 17 May 2013

Hassina Leelarathna
A scientific research study four years in the making and just released in the US spells a major windfall for Sri Lanka’s cinnamon industry.
Appearing in the April issue of the prestigious Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (JAFC), published by the American Chemical Society, the study by researchers at the University of Mississippi analyzing levels of the banned toxic chemical coumarin in cinnamon products affirms the superiority of Ceylon Cinnamon, AKA True Cinnamon, as compared to more widely used cinnamon substitutes.
High levels of coumarin, a chemical that naturally occurs in cinnamon, is toxic to the liver, acts as an anticoagulant, and is known to cause cancer in rodents.
According to the researchers, experiments conducted using a variety of popular cinnamon flavored foods and cinnamon food supplements found Ceylon Cinnamon to contain insignificant traces of coumarin whereas barks from cassia, imported from China, Vietnam and Indonesia and sold as cinnamon in the US, had substantial amounts of the toxic chemical.
“This is a great development that opens up many possibilities for Sri Lankan cinnamon growers,” said Ananda Wickremasinghe (now living in Canada) who has been patiently awaiting the results ever since he took the initiative to get the study started in 2009 while serving as Consul General in Los Angeles. Wickremasinghe, an agricultural graduate who spent most of his career as an agriculture scientist spotted the potential for promoting Ceylon Cinnamon in the US after its lower coumarin content and superiority over substitutes was established by European as well as Sri Lankan researchers. “Some Sri Lankan exporters were already aware of Ceylon Cinnamon’s lower coumarin levels and studies have been conducted by the Industrial Technology Institute. However, to gain acceptance in the US, an independent study by American researchers was needed.”
He presented the proposal to Dr. Dhammika Nanayakkara, Research Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Mississippi, one of the nation’s top pharmaceutical research colleges. Dr. Nanayakkara eventually co-authored the study with research scientists Dr. Yan Hong Wang (University of Mississippi), Bharathi Avula (University of Mississippi), Jianping Zhao, and Ikhlas A Khan.
The research was supported in part by “Science Based Authentication of Dietary Supplements” funded by the Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and the Global Research Network for Medicinal Plants (GRNMP), King Saud University.
The researchers analyzed coumarin and other compounds in authenticated cinnamon bark samples as well as locally bought cinnamon samples, cinnamon-flavoured foods and cinnamon-based food. “The experimental results indicated that C. Verum bark (Ceylon Cinnamon) contained only traces of coumarin, whereas barks from all three cassia species, especially C. loureirai (Vietnam Cinnamon) and C. burmannii (Indonesian Cinnamon), contained substantial amounts of coumarin,” the study said.
Researchers then analyzed of 21 cinnamon-flavoured foods such as cereals, snacks, bread, rolls, bun, swirl, bar and pastries, all purchased from local stores. Except for cinnamaldehyde that is essential for cinnamon flavour, coumarin was detected in all cinnamon-flavoured food products, varying in content from 0.05 to 2.4 mg per serving. Two cinnamon dietary supplements that contained powders of cinnamon bark were also analyzed and found to contain high coumarin levels – 2.5 and 3.9 mg per serving.
The identity of the cinnamon used in the samples was determined based on cinnamaldehyde and coumarin content, leading to the conclusion that most of the cinnamon used was of the Indonesian variety (C. burmannii) which has higher coumarin content, is cheaper and accounts for 90 percent of US cinnamon imports in the past five years.
Surprisingly, despite cinnamon’s widespread use as a flavouring in a wide range of foods and its growing popularity as a ‘miracle cure’ for everything from diabetes to weight loss, this is the first published study in the US that analyzes the coumarin content of cinnamon. As such this is also the first American study that affirms Ceylon Cinnamon’s low coumarin content – a fact long known to European researchers and industry insiders.
While coumarin has been banned in the US as a food additive since 1954, its presence is mostly associatedwithartificialvanilla(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/vanillahassinal@gmail.com

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The JAFC article warns that ingesting substantial amounts of coumarin on a daily basis may pose a health risk to individuals who are more sensitive to the compound. The researchers are calling for the establishment of a Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) and maximum limits for coumarin in foods marketed in the US.
European health agencies already recognize the adverse side effects of coumarin and EU regulations specify a TDI for coumarin of 0.1 milligrams of coumarin per kilogram for food products. But setting such limits doesn’t ensure compliance. Recent tests by a leading independent consumer protection group warned that coumarin levels in a variety of cookies, cereals and rice puddings sold in Germany were up to 20 times the European legal limit.
The US study, which establishes the occurrence of high coumarin levels in popular foods as well as health supplements, is bound to attract the attention of consumer groups and open the door to scrutiny of cinnamon additives by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the federal agency that oversees and sets guidelines for food safety.
Wickremesinghe believes Sri Lankan authorities should seize the opportunity and take proactive measures, such as promotional events by foreign missions, contacting food watchdogs and making oversight bodies such as the FDA and Health Canada in North America aware of the study, in order to maximize the leverage potential of Ceylon Cinnamon.
Sri Lanka’s share of the world cinnamon market is around 22 percent while its share of the US market is slightly less 6 percent.
Upping the statistics to 10 percent of the international market is well within reach, says Wickremasinghe, adding that every measure must be taken to increase cinnamon production. “It will require doubling Sri Lanka’s current cinnamon growing area, improving agronomic practices and extending cultivation into parts of the wet zone where cinnamon is not currently growing,” he says. He strongly believes coumarin free cinnamon plants could be found in Sri Lanka and that they could be used to introduce coumarin free cinnamon varieties.
Coincidentally, the study comes in the midst of a growing controversy over “The Cinnamon Challenge,” a prank that challenges teenagers to shovel a spoonful of ground cinnamon into their mouths. The fad has gone viral with over 40,000 videos posted on You Tube, nearly three million Google hits and on the flip side, dozens of challengers ending up in emergency rooms with serious problems such as collapsed lungs. Worried parents are scrambling to put a stop to it, while bloggers, talk show hosts, school authorities, and doctors are all weighing in. Surprisingly, doctors are coming out saying cinnamon is ‘totally harmless’ other than for an inert substance called cellulose which can lodge in the lungs. No mention of coumarin.
“What better time to start talking about the facts of cinnamon and the superiority of our cinnamon to the American public and pass the message along to other countries?,” asks Wickremasinghe.
The planets are definitely lined up in favour of a big push for Ceylon Cinnamon.

Hassina Leelarathna is a Los Angeles based writer. Contact hassinal@gmail.comhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/vanillahassin

US Research Study spells boom for Lanka’s Cinnamon Industry

US research study spells boom for Lanka’s cinnamon industry

By Hassina Leelarathna
Results of a scientific research study just released in the US and publicized by news media worldwide present a game-changing bonanza for Sri Lanka’s cinnamon industry needs.

In the first known US study to analyze levels of the banned toxic chemical coumarin in cinnamon products, University of Mississippi scientists have basically given Ceylon Cinnamon, AKA True Cinnamon, a gold seal of approval, affirming that it contains negligible traces of the chemical as compared to cheaper substitutes imported from China, Vietnam, and Indonesia.

The study appearing in the April issue of Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (JAFC), published by the American Chemical Society, warns that in high doses coumarin could cause liver and kidney damage and calls for the setting of daily intake levels.

Miracle cure
Given the exploding popularity of cinnamon, not simply as a food flavorant, but as a ‘miracle cure’ for a raft of health issues ranging from obesity to heart disease and arthritis, the findings spell boom time for the island’s cinnamon exports.

“This is a great development that opens up many possibilities for Sri Lankan cinnamon growers,” said Ananda Wickremasinghe (now living in Canada) who has been patiently awaiting the results ever since he took the initiative to get the study started in 2009 while serving as Consul General in Los Angeles.
Wickremasinghe, an agricultural graduate who spent most of his career as an agriculture scientist spotted the potential for promoting Ceylon Cinnamon in the US after its lower coumarin content and superiority over substitutes was established by European as well as Sri Lankan researchers.  “Some Sri Lankan exporters were already aware of Ceylon Cinnamon’s lower coumarin levels and studies have been conducted by the Industrial Technology Institute.  However, to gain acceptance in the U.S., an independent study by American researchers was needed.”

Findings
The researchers analyzed coumarin and other compounds in authenticated cinnamon bark samples as well as locally bought cinnamon samples, cinnamon-flavored foods, and cinnamon-based food.  “The experimental results indicated that C. verum bark [Ceylon Cinnamon] contained only traces of coumarin, whereas barks from all three cassia species, especially C. loureiroi (Vietnam Cinnamon) and C. burmannii (Indonesian Cinnamon), contained substantial amounts of coumarin,” the study said.

They then analyzed of 21 cinnamon-flavored foods such as cereals, snacks, bread, rolls, bun, swirl, bar and pastries, all purchased from local stores.  Except for cinnamaldehyde that is essential for cinnamon flavor, coumarin was detected in all cinnamon-flavored food products, varying in content from 0.05 to 2.4 mg per serving.  Two cinnamon dietary supplements that contained powders of cinnamon bark were also analyzed and found to contain high coumarin levels — 2.5 and 3.9 mg per serving.

The identity of the cinnamon used in the samples was determined based on cinnamaldehyde and coumarin content, leading to the conclusion that most of the cinnamon used was of the Indonesian variety (C.burmannii) which has higher coumarin content, is cheaper, and accounts for 90% of US cinnamon imports in the past five years.

Call for coumarin intake
The researchers are calling for the establishment of a daily intake and maximum limits for coumarin levels in foods and supplements marketed in the US.
Such benchmark doses have already been laid down in several European countries resulting from studies that established high coumarin levels in foods and supplements that used cassia in place of true cinnamon.

In 2008, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment established a TDI of 0.1 mg coumarin per kg body weight, while maintaining that short term excesses (2-3 weeks) poses no health hazards.

However, in a 2012 study, Norwegian researchers who re-assessed coumarin toxicity in the general population, scaled down the TDI to 0.07 mg/kg after determining that in children eating oatmeal porridge with cinnamon and adults drinking cinnamon tea or taking cinnamon supplements the TDI may be exceeded several folds.
In the Czech Republic, authorities monitor coumarin levels in cinnamon and in cinnamon-based foods closely and publicize the results annually.   Here too analyses of bakery products and breakfast cereals established high coumarin levels, all of it resulting from cassia derived flavoring and not from True Cinnamon.   A 2012 study by Czech scientists echoed concerns raised in Norway – that children could easily exceed tolerable daily intake by consuming as few as 3 to 4 cinnamon-spiced cookies.
Coumarin has inexplicably escaped such monitoring in the US, despite being on the FDA’s list of banned food additives since 1954.  The only scrutiny since then was a 2008 alert issued against artificial Mexican vanilla made with coumarin-containing tonka beans.  The FDA warned of increased bleeding risk for patients taking the prescription drug warfarin and advised consumers not to purchase this product.

Market share
Sri Lanka’s share of the world cinnamon market is around 22% while its share of the US market is slightly less than 6%.

Upping the statistics to 10 percent of the international market is well within reach says Wickremasinghe.  “It will require doubling Sri Lanka’s current cinnamon growing area, improving agronomic practices, and extending cultivation into parts of the wet zone where cinnamon is not currently growing,” he says.  He strongly believes coumarin free cinnamon plants could be found in Sri Lanka and that they could be used to introduce coumarin free cinnamon varieties.

The study was conducted by University of Mississippi scientists Dr. Dhammika Nanayakkara, Dr. Yan-Hong Wang, Dr. Jianping Zhao, and  Dr. Ikhlas A Khan.
It was supported in part by “Science Based Authentication of Dietary Supplements” funded by the Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, and the Global Research Network for Medicinal Plants (GRNMP), King Saud University. (Courtesy Eurasia Review)

(Hassina Leelarathna is a Los Angeles-based writer)

Cinnamon Extracts Boost Insulin Sensitivity

United States Department of Agriculture
Agricultural Research Service

Cinnamon Extracts Boost Insulin Sensitivity
Chemists identify compounds from cinnamon that improve the action of insulin. Link to photo information.
Chemists Richard Anderson and Marilyn Polansky use high-performance liquid chromatography to identify compounds from cinnamon that improve the action of insulin.
(K8953-1)
Agricultural Research Service scientists are seeking a patent on compounds extracted from cinnamon that make cells much more sensitive to insulin in test tube studies.
Nearly 6 percent of the U.S. population—15.7 million people—have diabetes, and one-third of them don’t even know it. The large majority of diabetes cases are type 2—the kind that usually begins in midlife. It is characterized by the failure of body cells to recognize and respond to insulin as well as they once did. This leads to elevated blood sugar because insulin’s job is to prompt cells to take in glucose.
Another 13.4 million people have elevated fasting blood sugar levels below the threshold indicating diabetes but are at high risk for developing the disease. Lack of exercise, being overweight, and genetic predisposition are often cited as contributing factors involved in the high incidence of diabetes in western countries.
Worldwide, this silent killer claims more than 100 million lives annually. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. And for many people, drugs or other forms of treatment are unavailable.
The search for a natural way to keep blood sugar levels normal began more than a decade ago when ARS chemist Richard A. Anderson and co-workers at the Beltsville (Maryland) Human Nutrition Research Center assayed plants and spices used in folk medicine. They found that a few spices—especially cinnamon—made fat cells much more responsive to insulin, the hormone that regulates sugar metabolism and thus controls the level of glucose in the blood.
With help from Walter F. Schmidt in ARS’s Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory at Beltsville, the researchers identified the compounds in cinnamon responsible for its activity. The patent application names Anderson, his co-workers C. Leigh Broadhurst and Marilyn M. Polansky, and Schmidt as the inventors.
Cinnamon is among the world’s most frequently consumed spices and is relatively inexpensive. Anderson and colleagues found that its most active compound—methylhydroxy chalcone polymer (MHCP)—increased glucose metabolism roughly 20-fold in a test tube assay of fat cells.
The researchers tested 50 some plant extracts and found that none of them came close to MHCP’s level of affecting glucose metabolism—a process in which cells convert glucose to energy. If in future research MHCP proves to do the same in people, it might provide a natural remedy against diabetes.
What’s more, MHCP prevented the formation of damaging oxygen radicals in a blood platelet assay.
“That could be an important side benefit,” notes Anderson. “Other studies have shown that antioxidant supplements can reduce or slow the progression of various complications of diabetes.”
MHCP is the first chalcone, a type of polyphenol or flavonoid, reported in cinnamon. MHCP and other active compounds are water soluble and are not found in the spice oils sold as food additives.
Anderson pointed out that the water extract reduced blood pressure in hypertensive rats even before it increased insulin sensitivity. And compounds in a water extract are less likely to be toxic in large doses than those in an oil extract, he says.—ByJudy McBride, Agricultural Research Service Information Staff.
This research is part of Human Nutrition, an ARS National Program (#107) described on the World Wide Web athttp://www.nps.ars.usda.gov/programs/appvs.htm.
Richard A. Anderson is at the USDA-ARS Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory, Bldg. 307, Room 224, 10300 Baltimore Ave., Beltsville, MD 20705-2350; phone (301) 504-8091, fax (301) 504-9062.
“Cinnamon Extracts Boost Insulin Sensitivity” was published in the July 2000 issue of Agricultural Researchmagazine.

Cinnamon, Glucose Tolerance and Diabetes

United States Department of Agriculture
Agricultural Research Service

Cinnamon, Glucose Tolerance and Diabetes

This research is performed by the
Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory (NRFL)
of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC).

Our studies have demonstrated that extracts of cinnamon increase insulin activity several-fold. These measurements are in vitro or test tube measurements of the ability of insulin to increase the breakdown of glucose. Insulin is the hormone that controls the utilization of the blood sugar, glucose. Improved insulin function leads to improved blood sugar concentrations.
We have published several scientific articles on cinnamon that may be of interest. There is a report inHormone Research, vol. 50, pages 177-182, 1998, and a second report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 20, pages 327-336, 2001, which illustrate the mechanism of action of the cinnamon. A manuscript containing the structures of the active components is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 52, pages 65-70, 2004 (Abstract). Our human study involving people with type 2 diabetes demonstrating mean improvements in blood glucose ranging from 18 to 29%; triglycerides, 23 to 30%; LDL-cholesterol, 7 to 27% and total cholesterol, 12 to 26%, is published in Diabetes Care, vol. 26, pages 3215-3218, 2003.
We have also shown that the active components of cinnamon are found in the water-soluble portion of cinnamon and are not present in cinnamon oil, which is largely fat-soluble. In addition to ground cinnamon consumed directly, one can also make a cinnamon tea and let the solids settle to the bottom or use cinnamon sticks, which make for a nice clear tea. Cinnamon can also be added to orange juice, oatmeal, coffee before brewing, salads, meats etc. The active components are not destroyed by heat.
Our recent human studies indicate that consuming roughly one half of a teaspoon of cinnamon per day or less leads to dramatic improvements in blood sugar, cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. Intake of cinnamon, at these levels, is very safe and there should not be any side effects. There are also companies selling water soluble components from cinnamon that contain the active ingredients with minimal amounts of the components that could be toxic at elevated levels.
Read more about this in the April 2004 issue of the Agricultural Research Magazine.
Richard A. Anderson, Ph.D., CNS
Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory

Cinnamon Extracts may reduce risk of Diabetes and Heart Disease, study suggests

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from universities, journals, and other organizations


Cinnamon extracts may reduce risk of diabetes and heart disease, study suggests

Date:
August 30, 2010
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
A water soluble extract of cinnamon, which contains antioxidative compounds, could help reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease, a new study suggests.


A study led by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) chemist Richard Anderson suggests that a water soluble extract of cinnamon, which contains antioxidative compounds, could help reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease.

The work is part of cooperative agreements between the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC) operated by USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at Beltsville, Md.; Integrity Nutraceuticals International of Spring Hill, Tenn., and the Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France. Anderson works in the Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory of BHNRC. ARS is USDA’s principal intramural scientific research agency.
For the study, conducted in Ohio, coauthor Tim N. Ziegenfuss, now with the Center for Applied Health Sciences based in Fairlawn, Ohio, enrolled volunteers and collected samples.
Twenty-two obese participants with impaired blood glucose values–a condition classified as “prediabetes”–volunteered for the 12-week experimental research study. Prediabetes occurs when cells are resistant to the higher-than-normal levels of insulin produced by the pancreas (in an attempt to help remove elevated glucose levels from blood).
The volunteers were divided randomly into two groups and given either a placebo or 250 milligrams (mgs) of a dried water-soluble cinnamon extract twice daily along with their usual diets. Blood was collected after an overnight fast at the beginning of the study, after six weeks, and after 12 weeks to measure the changes in blood glucose and antioxidants.
The study demonstrated that the water-soluble cinnamon extract improved a number of antioxidant variables by as much as 13 to 23 percent, and improvement in antioxidant status was correlated with decreases in fasting glucose, according to Anderson.
Only more research will tell whether the investigational study supports the idea that people who are overweight or obese could reduce oxidative stress and blood glucose by consuming cinnamon extracts that have been proven safe and effective. In the meantime, weight loss remains the primary factor in improving these numbers, according to ARS scientists.


Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. The original article was written by Rosalie Marion Bliss. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Anne-Marie Roussel, Isabelle Hininger, Rachida Benaraba, Tim N. Ziegenfuss, and Richard A. Anderson. Antioxidant Effects of a Cinnamon Extract in People with Impaired Fasting Glucose That Are Overweight or Obese. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 2009 28: 16-21

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. “Cinnamon extracts may reduce risk of diabetes and heart disease, study suggests.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100824103637.htm>.

5 Health Benefits of Cinnamon – Healing.Answers.com

healing.answers.com/diet/5-health-benefits-of-cinnamon
by Mica Akullianin 25 Google+ circles
One study, carried out by the U.S. Department of Nutrition, found that adding 1/2 a teaspoon of … To review these studies, visit Agricultural Research Service.
You may think of it as simply an added flavor, but cinnamon also has great health benefits. Yes, the spice that’s used in your delectable pumpkin pie can be good for your health. Cinnamon can help lower cholesterol, fight yeast infections, regulate your blood sugar, and relieve pain. It has even been shown to improve memory. Read on to learn more about the intriguing health benefits of cinnamon.

Lowers Cholesterol

Cinnamon is a healthy herb. One study, carried out by the U.S. Department of Nutrition, found that adding 1/2 a teaspoon of cinnamon helped participants lower their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in participants with type 2 diabetes. LDL cholesterol is the bad cholesterol that can lead to heart disease. Surprisingly, the study found that cinnamon did not affect the levels of good cholesterol in participants. The results of this study can be found at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Spoon this spice in your morning oatmeal, another heart-healthy food, and help keep your ticker running smoothly. See: National Center for Biotechnology Information

Anti-Bacterial Properties

Cinnamon has anti-bacterial properties. It can be used to fight fungal infections like yeast. This is because cinnamon can help keep the growth of Candida, the fungus that causes yeast infections, in check. Just as it can help balance cholesterol, it can also help balance the bacteria in your gut. Incorporate more cinnamon into your diet to keep bad bacteria at bay.
EDITOR’S TIP:
There are many easy ways to sneak cinnamon into your diet. However, if you don’t like the taste of cinnamon, there are other options. Cinnamon capsules are available for purchase at most health food stores, pharmacies, and grocery stores. You can take the spice in pill form and still receive its same benefits.

Blood Sugar Regulation

Several studies carried out by the United States Department of Agriculture showed that cinnamon can help balance blood sugar. Their results concluded that cinnamon extract helps increase the amount of insulin that’s produced by the body. To review these studies, visit Agricultural Research Service. Cinnamon can also help fight cravings, by preventing spikes in blood sugar. Sprinkle some cinnamon over your food, or even in your morning coffee, and help balance your blood sugar. See: Agricultural Research Service

Cognition and Memory Improvement

Enjoy the smell of cinnamon? Well, you might be getting a boost in cognition and memory from that delicious whiff. Studies have shown that the smell of cinnamon may help improve memory and cognition. Burn a cinnamon candle, or try cooking more with cinnamon. You might see benefits that extend beyond a good-smelling kitchen and home.

Pain Relief

There are claims that cinnamon can be an effective home remedy for pain. More specifically, the claims detail that cinnamon can help relieve headaches and migraines, and may also help relieve pain associated with arthritis. Unfortunately, there is no scientific evidence to substantiate these claims. Unless you are guzzling large amounts of cinnamon, there are no adverse side effects to testing this hypothesis at home. However, do not attempt to use cinnamon as an alternative to seeking primary care from a doctor.
You may think of it as simply a spice or smell, but cinnamon has a host of health benefits. You don’t have to eat buckets of cinnamon to see these. Instead, add a dash here and there to your oatmeal, yogurt, or on top of fruit to see health benefits. Finally, one last reason to add cinnamon to your diet is that it inhibits bacterial growth on food, which can help preserve it for longer.

Cinnamon Research Station (CRS)

Research Officer In – Charge

Mr. KGG. Wijesinghe, B Sc (Agric), M.Sc (UK)
Email : kggwijesinghe@esrilanka.lk
Research Officer Mr. DN. Samaraweera, B Sc (Agric), M.Sc.
Research Officer Mr. GG. Jayasinghe B Sc (Agric), M.Sc.
Research & Development Assistant Mrs. SN. Weerasuriya B Sc (Agric), M.Sc.
Research & Development Assistant Mr. RS. Munasinghe, B Sc (Agric)
Research & Development Assistant Mrs. HRSN. Kumari B Sc (Agric), M.Sc.
Research & Development Assistant Mrs. HLC. Darshanee B Sc (Agric),
Research & Development Assistant Mr. JS. Ekanayake, Diploma in Agriculture

The mission oftheCinnamonResearch Station is to plan and implementation of appropriate Research and Development programes to enhance productivity and quality of Cinnamon and Citronella.
 
 Current Research Programs

  • Development of high yielding cinnamon selections / varieties
  • Studies on plant spacing and density on Cinnamon bark yield
  • Collection and characterization of species in Genus Cinnamomum
  • Fertilizer studies on growth, yield and quality of cinnamon
  • Vegetative propagation and in vitro propagation of high yielding cinnamon selections
  • Identification and standardization of sulphur level in fumigated cinnamon quills
  • Study on flushing intervals on cinnamon peeling
  • Studies on factors affecting cinnamon leaf and bark oil quantity and quality
  • Floral biology, pollination and fruit set of selected Cinnamon accessions and wild relatives
  • Development of pheromone based IPM system for “Cinnamon Wood Boring Moth”
  • Studies of bio pesticides on insects and diseases for cinnamon plants at the nursery stage
  • Studies on leaf blight, white root and rough bark diseases in cinnamon cultivations
  • Studies on stem cracks damage in Cinnamon

Last Updated on Friday, 04 March 2011 12:01

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Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Health benefits of cinnamon

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Cinnamon is used to help treat muscle spasms, vomiting, diarrhea, infections, the common cold, loss of appetite, and erectile dysfunction (ED).
Cinnamon may lower blood sugar in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, according to Diabetes UK.1 However high quality research supporting the claim remains scarce.
Fungal infections – according to the National Institutes of Health2, cinnamaldehyde – a chemical found in Cassia cinnamon – can help fight against bacterial and fungal infections.
Cinnamon-other
Cinnamon sticks or quills.
Diabetes – cinnamon may help improve glucose and lipids levels3 in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetics Care.
The study authors concluded that consuming up to 6 grams of cinnamon per day “reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.” and that “the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.”
In addition, a certain cinnamon extract can reduce fasting blood sugar levels in patients, researchers reported in the European Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Alzheimer’s disease – Tel Aviv University researchers discovered that cinnamon may help preventAlzheimer’s disease. According to Prof. Michael Ovadia, of the Department of Zoology at Tel Aviv University, an extract found in cinnamon bark, called CEppt, contains properties that can inhibit the development of the disease.
HIV – a study of Indian medicinal plants revealed that cinnamon may potentially be effective against HIV4. According to the study authors, “the most effective extracts against HIV-1 and HIV-2 are respectively Cinnamomum cassia (bark) and Cardiospermum helicacabum (shoot + fruit).”
Multiple Sclerosis – cinnamon may help stop the destructive process of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a neurological scientist at Rush University Medical Center. Cinnamon could help eliminate the need to take some expensive and unpleasant drugs.
Lower the negative effects of high fat meals – Penn State researchers revealed that diets rich in cinnamon can help reduce the body’s negative responses to eating high-fat meals.

Nutritional profile

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture5, ten grams of ground cinnamon contains:

  • Energy: 24.7 kcal
  • Fat: 0.12 g
  • Carbohydrates: 8.06 g
  • Protein: 0.4 g

Risks and Precautions

Some people who are sensitive to cinnamon may be at an increased risk of liver damage after consuming cinnamon-flavored foods, drinks and food supplements.
This is likely due to the fact that cinnamon contains coumarin, which has been linked to liver damage.Ceylan cinnamon contains less coumarin than Cassia cinnamon.
Written by Joseph Nordqvist
Reviewed by: Megan Ware, RDN, LD, registered dietitian and nutritionist
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without the permission of Medical News Today.

Diseases and Conditions (Is it true that cinnamon can lower blood sugar in people who have diabetes?)

Mayo ClinicDiseases and Conditions

Is it true that cinnamon can lower blood sugar in people who have diabetes?

Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D.
Whether cinnamon can lower blood sugar is a topic of debate — but recent research suggests that cinnamon may be helpful as a supplement to regular diabetes treatment in people with type 2 diabetes.
A 2012 review of several recent studies concluded that the use of cinnamon had a potentially beneficial effect on glycemic control. One study published in 2009 found that a 500 mg capsule of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved hemoglobin A1C levels — a reflection of average blood sugar level for the past two to three months — in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1C levels greater than 7 percent).
More research is needed to confirm these findings and determine how cinnamon supplementation leads to these benefits. One theory is that cinnamon increases insulin action.
If you have diabetes, remember that treatment is a lifelong commitment of blood sugar monitoring, healthy eating, regular exercise and, sometimes, diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Consult your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your diabetes treatment plan.
With
M. Regina Castro, M.D.
Live Science